April 11th, 2010

2010 election digest: April 11

Fidesz wins as voters wait while Jobbik and LMP enter parliament: Fidesz cruised to easy victory, winning a majority of seats in parliament in the first round with 52.8% of the vote, outright winning 119 constituencies in an election day marred by long waits at polling places and a too-late announcement by the National Elections Committee to extend the “campaign silence” observance after the media already reported exit polls. The Socialist Party (MSZP) came in second with 19.3% with Jobbik receiving 16.7%. While it was largely expected that the Democratic Forum (MDF) would not reach the 5% threshold, eventually only reaching 2.7%, the big surprise was new left-liberal party LMP (Politics Can be Different), which won 7.4%, several percentage points above what was expected.

23:43: All of Budapest’s constituencies where a candidate received at least 50% were won by Fidesz, with the results so far being Péter Kovács in District XVI, Levente Riz in District XVII, Antal Rogán in District V, Zoltan Németh in Budafok Tétény, Zoltán Pokorni in Hegyvidék, Gábor Tamás Nagy in District I, and János Bácskai is tipped to win in District IX. [index.hu]

23:16: Within Budapest, with 98% of the votes counted, Fidesz won 46.2%, MSZP 25.5%, LMP 12.8%, Jobbik 10.9%, and MDF 4.7%, with a turnout of 69.6%. [index.hu]

23:08: Ibolya Dávid has announced her resignation as MDF chairwoman. [hirszerzo.hu]

23:00: Of the 176 individual constituencies, Fidesz came first in 174, winning mandates in 119 of them. The only two constituencies where they did not place first were both in Budapest’s District XIII. [index.hu]

22:56: With 99.18% of the votes counted, Fidesz has won 206 seats (53.37%), MSZP 28 (7.25%), Jobbik 26 (6.74%) ad LMP 5 (1.30%) in the first round, thereby meaning that regardless of the results in the second round, Fidesz has won the elections. [valasztas.hu]

22:47: US ambassador Eleni Tsakopoulos-Kounalakis paid a visit to the LMP’s party headquarters where she talked with the party leaders about the election delays before leaving after a few minutes. [origo.hu]

22:43: Ildikó Lendvai has said the MSZP has not ruled out taking a closer look into the polling places where delays arose. [index.hu]

22:32 People in Fidesz are concerned that the MSZP and Jobbik will use the evening’s delays in voting to contest the validity of the elections. [index.hu]

22:29: The OVB has decided that they will start to release the results from today’s election. We wonder if the leaking of the figures had anything to do with it. [hirszerzo.hu]

22:18: We hasten to add that these results are coming from the Mandiner blog which is posting via tumblr. [mandiner.tumblr.com]

22:15: Both index.hu and Népszabadság are now reporting preliminary results. Index reports Fidesz 54%, MSZP 19%, Jobbik 16% and LMP 6.7%, while Népszabadság is reporting Fidesz 53%, MSZP 19%, Jobbik 17% and LMP 7%. [index.hu, nol.hu]

22:09 Voting is also over in Győr and Miskolc. [index.hu]

22:06: Voting has ended in Szeged. [index.hu]

21:57: Debrecen mayor and Fidesz vice chairman Lajos Kósa has called for the resignations of those in leadership positions at the OVB. [nol.hu]

21:47: Masochists and the exceptionally bored can tune in to Hungarian state television MTV to watch the OVB currently arguing over various points of electoral law.

21:39: Voting is expected to conclude by 11 p.m. in Pécs, but may drag on as long as 2:30 in the morning in Budapest’s District XI. [index.hu, index.hu]

21:30: Voting has ended in Debrecen. [index.hu]

21:22: A total of 66,082 people asked for permission to vote “away from home” in the elections, as opposed to 57,999 four years ago. [index.hu]

21:16: The Mandiner blog is reporting early election results. Since no one (including the Hungarian media) seems to be certain of the legal ramifications of the campaign silence extension, we’ll only link to the post. Until the silence is canceled or we start posting results ourselves, please don’t repost them in the comments below. [mandiner.blog.hu]

21:09: Four polling places are still open in Budapest as well as one each in Szeged, Debrecen and Pécs, thus making it seven in total. [hirszerzo.hu]

21:05: Hungarian state television’s website hirado.hu is for all intents and purposes offline, likely due to overwhelming traffic.

21:03: Apparently half of the OVB wants to call the campaign silence off (since they only managed to announce its extension after exit polls were released), while the other half insists it remain in effect as long as some polls remain open. [nol.hu]

20:55: Voting may continue until midnight in Budapest’s Zugló area, with 500 people still waiting to vote in District XI, 100 in Győr and “lots of people” still waiting in Pécs. Politicians are reluctant to speak until the campaign silence is officially over. [index.hu]

20:34: Criticism continues to mount about the OVB’s decision to extend the “campaign silence” period, with some saying it proves the OVB is badly run, and others saying it goes against the spirit of the law. [mno.hu]

20:17: While most Hungarian media websites are noticeably running slower tonight, origo.hu and nol.hu seem to be hit a lot harder.

20:15: Tamás Hegedüs, Jobbik’s economics specialist told origo.hu that he expects the party will poll between 15-20%. [origo.hu]

20:11: It’s now expected that voting will continue until 11 p.m. in Budapest’s District XI. [mno.hu]

20:03 Polling places where those voting outside of their usual places can vote remained open after 7 p.m. in 17 of Budapest’s 23 districts. In District XI 400 people are still waiting in line, with a similar number waiting in District XIII. Reports of lines numbering around 300 are also coming in from Pécs. [index.hu, index.hu]

19:53: Jobbik party activists were chased by a vehicle after filming several busloads of Roma being transported to Vásárosnamény to vote, a party spokesman announced. While they were being chased they called the police who later apprehended the suspect. [index.hu]

19:45: In terms of international media, the current elections don’t seem to be making as much of an impact as might have been expected, given the “colorful” Jobbik angle. Right as the polls were closing, a search of “Hungarian elections” on Google News came up with almost exactly the same number of results as a search for “Robert Pattinson Budapest” (the Hollywood star has been in town over the past few weeks filming a new movie). [news.google.com]

19.42 According to Szonda, Fidesz received 57%, MSZP 19%, Jobbik 15%, LMP 5.5% and MDF 3%. Századvég in turn predicts Fidesz 56%, MSZP 19%, Jobbik 15%, LMP 5% and MDF 4%. Median predicts Fidesz 55%, MSZP 19%, Jobbik 17%, LMP 6% and MDF 3%. [nol.hu]

19:37 According to a Nézőpont poll, Fidesz received 54%, MSZP 20%, Jobbik 17%, LMP 6% and MDF 3%. [mno.hu]

19:33 The OVB (National Elections Committee) has just announced that the “campaign silence” is still in effect due to some polling places remaining open, about fifteen minutes after websites began reporting on exit polls. [nol.hu]

19:20: According to two polls conducted by the Socialist Party, they are expecting to receive either 19% or 27%, although the 19% figure is considered more reliable. Both polls, however, showed them coming in at second place ahead of Jobbik. [index.hu]

19:14: So far today, twenty people have needed medical attention while voting or working at polling station. While most incidents were minor, a 58 year old woman in Berhida died from a heart attack while at her polling station. [origo.hu]

19:07: People voting outside of their normal voting district are believed to be causing the long lines at several polling places. Although this was first tested at last year’s EP elections, the lower turnout didn’t allow these problems to surface at the time. [index.hu]

19:00: And polls are now closed.

18:55: After seeing these photos of voters via Magyar Nemzet, we suspect the BBC uses photos taken in the one village where everyone dresses like an ethnographic museum exhibit.

18:47: While we wait for the polls to close and for results to start coming in, we’d like to thank the BBC for continuing their tradition of including a picture about the elections featuring people who dress nothing like the average Hungarian voter just like they did in 2004 and 2006.

18:31: Some polling stations will stay open after 7 p.m., as anyone already in line to vote by the time polls close will still be allowed to cast their ballot. [origo.hu]

18:14: Turnout at 5:30 p.m. was 59.3%, down from 61.7% in 2006. [valasztas.hu, index.hu]

17:17: Just to illustrate how there really is nothing to report yet, the most exciting news in the past hour was that a voter in Szeghalom photographed his own ballot. [index.hu, origo.hu]

14:03: Turnout at 13:00 p.m. 35.9%, compared to 38.2% in 2006. Rain halted in Budapest but skies still dark. [index.hu]

13:06: Attila Mesterházy, the Socialist candidate for prime minister, has cast his vote in Veszprém, while in Budapest, clouds overtake the earlier sunny weather, suggesting a further drag on turnout. [nol.hu]

11:56: Turnout by 11:00 a.m. is said to have totaled 24.8%, down from 27.2% in 2006. [origo.hu]

11:52: Jobbik leader Gábor Vona has voted in District III, leaving the MSZP the only major party with a leader who has not shown his or her face this morning. [index.hu]

10:57: András Schiffer and Lajos Bokros, leaders of LMP and MDF, have cast their votes (both in Pest). No sign yet of their counterparts from the Socialists and Jobbik. [index.hu]

10:23: Both Prime Minister Gordon Bajnai and the man who hopes to replace him – Fidesz Chairman (and former PM) Viktor Orbán – have cast their votes at polling stations in Budapest’s District XII. Bajnai apparently showed up and voted alone. [origo.hu]

10:13: Turnout at 9:00 a.m. down to 10.2% from 11.4% in the first round in 2006. [index.hu]

10:06: Turnout at 7:00 a.m. was 1.6%, down a tenth of a percent from the last general election. [index.hu]

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  • Some people had fun this morning and painted Nazi-related slogans outside several voting stations.
    The local Government tried to remove the graffiti, but still visible as can be seen:

    http://kep.index.hu/1/0/140/1408/14088/1408829_3d9470cb95bc83f4736ea0f788de5528_wm.jpg

    According to Hungarian Law no political slogans or symbols are allowed outside or inside the polling station, so some one can of course complain and demand the votes are to be destroyed

  • Editor’s Note: Due to Hungary’s “campaign silence” laws, today’s coverage will be limited until the closing of polls at 19:00 CET.

    Erik probably does not feel obligated to observe Hungarian election laws but most lists suspended comments about Hungarian politics.
    It is no big deal since we only have two Hungarian voters, Elle and Law and they are not influenced by anything the village idiot may post.
    Is it possible to stop the comments and only report what is happening until 7 PM?

  • Körösi István

    @LHVJ. ‘You’ have only two registered voters? Who
    are ‘you’? Do you speak for some registered
    authority called ‘us’? Dou ‘you’ have any means of
    rapid detection for non-voters writing here, in
    these superb-worded collection? By the way, if ‘you’
    existed, you would notice the huge collection of
    hate speech, anti-minority messages, insults, a.s.o.

  • TDS

    Not quite. You’ll find that index.hu is providing minute-by-minute updates, e.g. this story here:
    http://index.hu/belfold/2010/valasztas/tobb_oras_sorban_allas_az_igazolasos_szavazok_miatt/

  • you would notice the huge collection of
    hate speech, anti-minority messages, insults, a.s.o.
    Körösi István at April 11, 2010 4:11 PM

    Easy to see that most of the hate speech is directed at Jobbik and Hungarians by the usual suspects who accuse Hungarians of hate speech…
    THE VOICE OF THE OPPRESSED IS ALWAYS HATE SPEECH TO THE OPPRESSORS

  • Körösi István

    I liked the Stalinist message, that one with the
    ‘voice of the oppressors’ – it looked exactly like
    the Komintern documents made in comrade A. A.
    Zhdanov’s offices in the late 1930s. It made me
    feel fifty years younger. But I liked the most the
    usage of the term ‘suspect’ for anyone happening
    to notice the huge amount of hate speech posted by
    the members of this ‘discussion-club’. What about
    the way the ‘us’ detects the ‘suspects’? Anyway,
    it seems very clear that the way the gentleman
    thinks belongs to people I got fed up during all
    my youth in a Communist country. So do not pose as
    ‘patriots’: actually, the Hungarian Communist
    Party used exactly the same tactics in the
    beginning of the 1950s. You are simply pathetic.
    You probably are able to delude people from
    outside, but try to abandon this discourse – maybe
    some stupid kids will follow you, but not for
    long. This mixture between ‘voice of opressors’-
    type and the etarnal plotters (of course
    Westerners) is too obvious for not being
    ridiculous.

  • Tell us about your youth in a Communist country. Was it under Rakosi and his Jewish cabinet and his Jewish AVO? Did you work for one or the other?

  • Florian Geyer

    To Jobbik or not to Jobbik ?
    This is the only question which is awaited today.
    If Jobbik gets +20% and overtakes MSZP it means that
    the time of awakening of the Magyar nation has come.
    It is a tremenodous chance for rebirth.
    Be responsible, be Magyar, go out and vote.

  • Erik probably does not feel obligated to observe Hungarian election laws
    LHVJ at April 11, 2010 3:09 PM

    He do it better than kuruc-info, they continue their hate-mongering as usual, but that is of course not politics…

  • @LHVJ: No doubt if I had suspended all comments on
    the website during “campaign silence” you would have
    said it was a Jewish plot, or an Albanian plot, or
    whatever.

  • MTI:
    Elections 2010 – Median poll predicts Fidesz two-thirds majority
    4/11 19:08

    I assume that is an exit poll

    And I think 2 persons died in total trying to vote (not known if they actually voted in this life or not)

  • TDS

    So early indications are that Fidesz will have a 2/3 majority, and MSzP will be comfortably the second largest party. Also good news for LMP who look to have made it.
    MDF? SzDSz? Never heard of them…

  • Jobbik claims they have let its Magyar Garda do an exit poll and found that the Jobbik vote would be between 30-40%
    The following picture was attached to that report
    Pollsters in action?

    http://kep.index.hu/1/0/140/1409/14094/1409447_edab74a882702db685e71999a8a5f5dc_wm.jpg

    ‘So little lady did you vote for Jobbik or not?’
    .
    Also Jobbik is complaining that Roma were transported in to vote (why that would be illegal, but this is Hungary…)

    Will the clock be 20:00 before the first complaints starts coming ‘the communist jews stole our election’, like Csurka/MIEP has done since 2002

  • 19:53: Jobbik party activists were chased by a vehicle after filming a busload of Roma being transported to Vásárosnamény to vote

    One has to understand the problem here
    This is countryside
    Jobbik country
    By filming them, they are identified (hard to do inside the voting station) and you can bet your last dime this film will be studied by the local squadron of Magyar Garda, which will pay some ‘visits’

    If MSZP, or any other ‘commie jewish’ organisation to use Lobotomy’s choice of words, had done this, exactly this, filming a group of people going in/out voting, what would that had been called?
    .
    Any one thinking Jobbik is not in the business of also registering voters?

  • bobscountrybunker

    The ferrying of voters to the polls is strictly against Hungarian electoral law. Photographing this, to prove that it has taken place, is not.

  • The ferrying of voters to the polls is strictly against Hungarian electoral law. Photographing this, to prove that it has taken place, is not.
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 8:16 PM

    Then I must hereby declare that my family has broken the law by driving members of my extended family to the polling station with a gasoline driven auto-mobile
    We did though not use a ‘ferry’, so maybe we are clear? We were unable to find a river between our home and the voting station

    Does the type of ‘ferrying vehicle’ make a difference, like 30 Roma on top a horse-driven cart?
    Or 30 Roma in a public bus making an extra stop at the voting station?
    What about 75 Roma ordering a bus in cooperation, they would not allowed to do that?
    They must walk?
    US South States any one?

  • bobscountrybunker

    Viking if you find systematic electoral fraud such a matter for hilarity, then we learn a great deal about your real respect for democracy, don’t we?
    One wonders if you’d feel the same way if this fraud was being carried out to the benefit of another party whose name springs to mind.

  • Viking if you find systematic electoral fraud such a matter for hilarity, then we learn a great deal about your real respect for democracy, don’t we?
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 9:06 PM

    If taking people to the polling station is “systematic electoral fraud”, well then I am all for “systematic electoral fraud”
    The whole idea to get people to vote is to bring them to the voting station, not hinder them
    Some km of walk is an hindrance
    Of course, for some reason, the distance is never that big in non-Roma areas
    The *fraud* is done when people vote several times, or the rep is voting for them (changing the vote for an elderly person)
    The latter happens even in Sweden in old peoples homes. This is fraud

    Helping people to go to the polling station can never ever be fraud, then they all need to walk alone and identify themselves to the officials, getting the election-slip/s/ from the official individually and walking to the ‘secret’ boot to cross and fold and go back and put it in the ballot box
    All alone, under the supervision of the officials
    Who will know how they voted?
    Do you?

  • TDS

    What an absolute farce!
    You can’t announce projected results and then pretend you haven’t. The OVB should have clarified this with broadcasters weeks ago.
    But in any case, this system of away-from-home voters only being able to vote at one polling station is ludicrous in the extreme. Total embarrassment.

  • bobscountrybunker

    They are breaking the law. The law is clear.
    From the holding of databases, over stepping of the the campaign limit, and now this: the electoral regulations of Hungary are being broken.
    Thank you for making it clear that you’re cool with that. I am not.

  • Thank you for making it clear that you’re cool with that. I am not.
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 9:18 PM

    Who is now putting ‘words in a silent mouth’?
    I am all for transporting voters to the polling station – Yes!
    I did that today with the parts of my extended family that wanted to vote (all that actually could)
    How many millions of law breakers did Hungary today create?
    Every husband that took his wife in the car (or vice versa) is a law-breaker
    And you are happy with that(?)
    Who is the hypocrite
    Admit the law is just to stop poor Roma from voting, when the polling station is put so far away no one will walk there

  • bobscountrybunker

    Admit the law is just to stop poor Roma from voting, when the polling station is put so far away no one will walk there
    Viking at April 11, 2010 9:28 PM

  • cora

    “A total of 66,082 people asked for permission to vote “away from home” in the elections, as opposed to 57,999 four years ago.”
    These people are probably not voting “away from home”. I think they are voting where they really live, but their official address is somewhere else. Why do they have a different official address? Because there are many benefits Hungarians can get based on their place of residence. For example, parents of a baby born in district 11 receive 80,000 forints. Parents of a baby born anywhere else in Bp do not get this money. Another reason why many people have an offical address somewhere else is that they want to help their family get gas subsidy. If enough people appear to be living under one address and enough of them don’t work (kids, pensioners), the family gets subsidy.

  • TDS

    A friend of mine from the 11th district tells me she went home to Szeged today to vote. Driving there + voting + driving back = less time than it would have taken her to vote here. Hilarious.

  • Admit that the MSZP is ferrying these Roma to bolster their vote.
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 9:30 PM

    Personally I have not a clue who is doing the ‘ferrying’, but where I come from and learn parliamentarian democracy, Sweden, it is no crime getting ‘your’ voters to the voting station, *as long as* the actual voting is a personal/secret thing
    Same thing in the US, which many of the Jobbik-supporters on this site claim is The Good Democracy
    .
    I think we can agree that the Hungarian Law is like this, but do *you* really think it is good?
    You have never helped your parents or elderly relatives to come to the polling station?
    .
    I helped my parents in law today
    They ‘dressed up’ just to go out and vote
    They would never had walked those 450 m, I drove them
    Is that so bad?
    .
    And what if I would have picked up my poor neighbour?
    I do have a big car, so all get a good place and following all traffic regulations, so what would have been bad with that?
    .
    Just your personal opinion?

  • bobscountrybunker

    Personally I have not a clue who is doing the ‘ferrying’
    Viking at April 11, 2010 9:53 PM

  • Personally I have not a clue who is doing the ‘ferrying’
    Viking at April 11, 2010 9:53 PM

  • bobscountrybunker

    “Do not be an ass-hole now”
    Viking at April 11, 2010 10:06 PM

  • 21:57: Debrecen mayor and Fidesz vice chairman Lajos Kósa has called for the resignations of those in leadership positions at the OVB

    Yes, immediately
    Then have a new bunch of people and start again….
    .
    it seems to be a bit of old Soviet-style of behaviour to always claim that some one is fired
    What would it actually change?
    If people come late, people come late
    What should you do, shoot people?
    I would not vouch on this one, but my wife claims it is the students in the XI-district that came late, and they probably did on purpose
    Who knows, but I think we have a trend

  • And the 2010 Pot calling the kettle black award goes to…
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 10:15 PM

    So you are just a coward who cannot have your own opinion or not even explain it:

    Try to concentrate on the question at hand:
    * Do _you_ think that helping people to go to their polling station should be a crime?
    .
    If so, please explain for us stupid foreigners just *why*?
    Viking at April 11, 2010 10:06 PM

  • bobscountrybunker

    So you are just a coward who cannot have your own opinion or not even explain it:
    Viking at April 11, 2010 10:19 PM

  • I have never been called a coward before by someone too terrified to answer a Yes or No question about whether a particular sentence was clear or not, over 19 times.
    There is a first time for everything, I suppose.
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 10:22 PM

    This is a simple question, do not need a YES/NO answer. You are allowed to answer in any format, but:
    * Do _you_ think that helping people to go to their polling station should be a crime?
    .
    If so, please explain for us stupid foreigners just *why*?
    Viking at April 11, 2010 10:06 PM
    Viking at April 11, 2010 10:19 PM

  • bobscountrybunker

    @Viking
    I’ve told you this – several times – before, if, when faced with the simplest of questions requiring a yes or no answer, you’ve bounced around without giving a response as enthusiastially as a kangaroo on a pogostick…
    (I recall one about whether or not you take sugar in your coffee which required a 300 word piece of question dodging.)
    …Then what – really what – gives you even a trace of an impression that I would be even remotely interested in answering one of yours?
    The name for this phenomena is called the consequences of your actions.

  • Farkas László

    Here is what http://www.index.hu is reporting so far about the election results:
    “A szavazókörök delegáltjaitól származó információk szerint 48 százalékos feldolgozottságnál a Fidesz 54 százalékkal vezet, az MSZP 19, a Jobbik 17, az LMP 7, az MDF 2 százalékon áll. ”
    “According to information reported from voting precincts, with 48% returns, Fidesz leads with 54%, MSZP 19%, Jobbik 17%, LMP &% and MDF 2%”

  • Farkas László

    Sorry, typo correction above: “LMP 7%”

  • wolfi

    Hi Everybody!
    Doesn’t look too bad to me. I’m glad LMP made it.
    PS It’s 2 oçlock pm here in SFO, raining like mad …
    We’ll be in Hungary soon …

  • Then what – really what – gives you even a trace of an impression that I would be even remotely interested in answering one of yours?
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 10:39 PM
    —-
    Like sounding like a democrat, interesting in Hungarian citizens have the opportunity in doing their democratic right to vote?
    .
    Oh, no I nearly forgot, you are the Jobbik mouth-piece so you cannot be for that, just against that *every* Hungarian citizens vote
    Only the pro-Jobbik counts of course
    .
    Viva la Magyar Garda, they will be the only one doing the ‘ferrying’ of voters, in your dreams

  • bobscountrybunker

    Ah yes a comment that quotes me, and then makes a statement with no relationship whatsoever to what I have said.
    Yes, those never grow old.
    So as the “Jobbik mouth-piece” let me ask you what you thought of the fact that Jobbik exceeded your 500,000 voter ceiling? By, erm, at least 300,000.

  • So as the “Jobbik mouth-piece” let me ask you what you thought of the fact that Jobbik exceeded your 500,000 voter ceiling? By, erm, at least 300,000.
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 11:17 PM

    Will check that when the finals are in
    Good for you if they did
    Still have a problem sounding like a a democrat, interesting in Hungarian citizens have the opportunity in doing their democratic right to vote?

  • bobscountrybunker

    LMP coming ahead of Jobbik in Budapest.
    That’s big news. Impressive turnout too.
    Seems this is what they want after all.
    http://kuruc.info/galeriaN/egyeb/barikadheti10312.jpg
    Joke! Joke!

  • LMP coming ahead of Jobbik in Budapest.
    That’s big news. Impressive turnout too.
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 11:20 PM

    Yes most people have walking distance, or public transport, to their voting station, without the need to walk some km
    Maybe Jobbik should propose that public transport is ceased on voting day?

  • bobscountrybunker

    Dude, you’re on a different planet.

  • *THE* joke of this election:

    http://barikad.hu/node/50889

  • Dude, you’re on a different planet.
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 11:30 PM

    Well, you are the one who is claiming that it is OK that not as many as possible voters come in and vote on election day, so on which planet do you live?
    Not on planet Democracy!
    Planet HollyWood?

  • The thing with LMP is that they are still pushing Transparent International (MTV 1 at the moment) and that makes them stick out, even if they actually are not my cup of tea, but MDF need to do a bit soul-searching for the next 2 years
    .
    Any way I have my exit planned tomorrow, look out for those rainbow-kipas at Ferihegy

  • bobscountrybunker

    Not on planet Democracy!
    Viking at April 11, 2010 11:38 PM

  • This is the picture in the Conservative SvD, Sweden
    (Where do they find these voters?):

    http://www.svd.se/multimedia/dynamic/00578/ungern620_578713b.jpg

    I can only add that Bela Szandelszky/AP took the picture
    The text is rather neutral just reporting the preliminary results and that it will mean a change in Government. The leading in is:
    “Socialist Government fell on tax-raises and retirement-cuts. Right-extreme party in to the Parliament”

  • Not on planet Democracy!
    Viking at April 11, 2010 11:38 PM

  • Says the man for whom breaking electoral law is just fine and dandy
    bobscountrybunker at April 11, 2010 11:55 PM

    Actually, thinking about it
    In my car was at least 1 or 2 persons I would think voted for Jobbik
    Of course I do not really know, then I was not in the voting boot with them, but I can just think…

    Do I really want going to prison for some Jobbik-votes?
    .
    Tough question, but principles (in difference to ‘bob’) are actually principles, so YES I am ready to go to prison for ‘ferrying’ my extended family to the voting station!
    Why do ‘bob’ not report me?
    (Tip, contact Erik, he knows everything needed to know, and if he do not he will find out)

  • From the biggest Swedish Morning Paper (DN):

    http://www.dn.se/nyheter/varlden/vantad-storseger-for-ungerska-hogern-1.1075939

    A write up from TT-Reuters-AFP, repeating that Hungary was in Greece situation late 2008, but was saved by a 20 BEUR loan and now the Government has to pay the price of following the pay-back terms with tax-raises and cuts of salaries and retirement-benefits

  • Fenyő

    As a Hungarian, I am ashamed today. While elsewhere in the world the Holocaust Remembrance Day takes place today, in Hungary the descendants of those who butchered Jews are again in the parliament.

  • Kriszti

    It is a disgrace that Jobbik made it thus far!
    Seriously, what are people thinking …

  • Roland

    Jesus Kriszti. We can always differentiate between the wankers, the misinformed, and complete fucking dipsticks. They continually post insults about a party that only received 16% of the vote.
    Fidesz will form the new government. They will be responsible for what happens over the next four years.
    The MSZP is the culprit for the total decimation
    of Hungary’s credibility these past eight years.
    Get that into your dull-brained, dimwitted, moronic mixed-up mind and start saying something relevant for a change.
    Reform, fighting corruption, overhaul of justice and tax systems, job programs, transport,education and welfare, developing trade, etc etc. Start commenting on this little lot which directly impacts on ordinary Hungarians.

  • sheesh

    @ Fenyő
    As a Hungarian (living in Hungary) I am ashamed that while elsewhere in CE Europe countries have owned up to their past and held their Communist leaders accountable, in Hungary the descendants of those who butchered Hungarians in 1956 and caused the suffering of millions of Hungarians for 40 + 8 years have ruled this country for so long.

  • @sheesh
    You and Roland answered these hate mongers and there is little I need to add but I would like to make a correction. The Communists (MKP and MSZMP) terrorized Hungarians from 1945 until 1989 (44 years). During those years they committed unspeakable crimes against hundreds of thousands of Hungarians in their prisons, torture chambers and death camps. That was the Hungarian Holocaust and these hate mongers were the perpetrators. After the gengszterváltás, there were 4 years of MDF and another 4 years Fidesz government. The remaining 12 years the same Communist murderers ruled Hungary who murdered Hungarians before 1989. They stole everything the Hungarians had and children and grandchildren would have.
    It was long past due to take out the trash…

  • I understand the sense of relief and triumph that comes with kicking MSZP’s arse, but I don’t think anyone should get carried away just yet.They still did manage to get a larger proportion than Jobbik, and so still are a force, albeit much reduced for now, in politics.It’s really important now to keep the pressure on them, and not to allow them to regroup and come back.I genuinely apologise if this is seen as offensive to some, it is honestly not meant to, but Hungary as a whole needs to recognise that it has a bit of ‘Stockhom syndrome’ when it comes to the communists. The fact that they were elected to government for 12 out of the 20 years AFTER they had been an oppressive dictatorship is a very sobering and telling fact.It is obviously a fantastic thing that they have been soundly kicked out of government, but now is not the time to get complacent.

    Any bets on how long the ‘election honeymoon’ will last before people start complaining about being disillusioned with Fidez not living up to expectations? I mean, it’s inevitable.Generally speaking it takes the whole of a government’s first term just to set the groundwork for sweeping change, and much longer for those changes to bear fruit.Most people can’t think that long-term and start to get restless when things aren’t massively better within the first year.Most real reform takes longer than an election cycle, which is one of the reasons why most governments stop short of really shaking things up.

  • After the gengszterváltás, there were 4 years of MDF and another 4 years Fidesz government. The remaining 12 years the same Communist murderers ruled Hungary who murdered Hungarians before 1989. They stole everything the Hungarians had and children and grandchildren would have.
    It was long past due to take out the trash…
    LHVJ at April 12, 2010 3:22 PM
    ====
    Hungary as a whole needs to recognise that it has a bit of ‘Stockhom syndrome’ when it comes to the communists. The fact that they were elected to government for 12 out of the 20 years AFTER they had been an oppressive dictatorship is a very sobering and telling fact.It is obviously a fantastic thing that they have been soundly kicked out of government, but now is not the time to get complacent
    Cináed at April 13, 2010 6:01 AM

    Stockholm-syndrome or not, the main reason can be that neither MDF (90-94) nor the old Orban-administration (98-02) were any better when it comes to the thing that bothers normal people the most, money in the wallet and social status
    .
    The actual coming back for MSZP in 94 and 02 (and being the first to keep an earlier win, in 06) shows that the typical ‘anti-communist’ arguments that are so important for the MIEP/Jobbik-followers, are just not that for the absolute majority of the Hungarian electorate
    .
    Who are able to explain on *how* a future MSZP comeback can/will be prevented in 14, except that enough voters will be happy with Fidesz’ performance?
    .
    Old commies in Fidesz?
    Why no criticism?

  • Viking: “the main reason can be that neither MDF (90-94) nor the old Orban-administration (98-02) were any better when it comes to the thing that bothers normal people the most, money in the wallet and social status”

    I was under the impression that Hungary’s economy was doing better under the 98-02 Orban government. Is that not the case? I realise that overall numbers don’t always translate into a happy population

  • John Simpson

    No need look back further than the last 8 years of hell, theft and corruption….
    Enough is enough!!!
    I will give the Fidesz government my full support. This is their last chance and I am confident they have learned by their previous mistakes which were nothing when compared to the criminal negligence of the past 8 years!
    One thing I would ask is that a body be set up to bring to justice all the persons involved in corruption, stealing and general mismanagement of the tax payers assets, whichever party they may be affiliated with!

  • I was under the impression that Hungary’s economy was doing better under the 98-02 Orban government. Is that not the case? I realise that overall numbers don’t always translate into a happy population
    Cináed at April 13, 2010 10:44 AM

    Yes, the economy was doing better in the 98-02 Orban government, compared to 90-98
    When Fidesz felt that their support faded in the polls around 2000, they started to ‘buy’ the people with minimum wage, higher pensions etc
    This started the downward spiral that continued to 2006-2007, where the State spent more money than it could afford, or did not earn enough…

    The reason why Fidesz lost in 2002 was that MSZP outbid them in offerings of a richer future for the normal voter. The MSZP Government really increased the spending and the spiral downward continued, but it took some years until reality hit normal people

    For some reason the return of MSZP 2002 really kicked off the radical right wing in Hungary and the violence that followed
    It was a point in time of radicalisation

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